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Delaware Department of Transportation

Delaware Strategic Highway Safety Plan

Making Walking and Street Crossing Safer

Pedestrians must consider safety, in addition to infrastructure and proximity of destination, when deciding to walk as a transportation alternative. Therefore, improving pedestrian safety has the potential to increase pedestrian activity and reduce congestion on Delaware's roadways. Providing livable communities, communities that provide safe and convenient transportation choices for all citizens, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users and motorists, are a high priority in Delaware. In addition to engineering safer transportation solutions for pedestrians, educating and enforcing the public on pedestrian laws and improving driver awareness of pedestrians are also critical strategies to advance pedestrian safety.

Pedestrian Bicycle Working Group

The Delaware Department of Transportation, in conjunction with our partners at the Office of Highway Safety and Delaware State Police established the pedestrian/bicycle safety working group in February 2013 due to the number of pedestrian and bicycle related fatalities and incapacitating injury crashes in 2012. The purpose of the working group was to develop ideas and methods for improving pedestrian and bicycle safety through engineering, education, enforcement, and emergency service related activitiesMore information...


Pedestrian Safety Campaign

OHS Pedestrian Safety Information


US 13/US 40 Pedestrian Safety Study

Intersection Image During 2006, the State of Delaware experienced an unusually high number of pedestrian fatalities. Research conducted by DelDOT's Division of Planning identified several corridors within New Castle County with unusually high concentrations of pedestrian crashes including US 13, US 40, and SR 273.

The US 13 and US 40 Pedestrian Safety Study evaluated the existing pedestrian accommodations for the US 13 corridor between SR 273 (Frenchtown Road) and Saienni Boulevard and the US 40 corridor between US 13 and Buckley Boulevard. The evaluation included an extensive data collection effort including crash data, pedestrian observations and counts, intersection turning movement counts, physical inventory, DART ridership information and general observations of traffic operations and pedestrian activity, and an in-depth investigation to identify problem locations, underlying deficiencies and opportunities for improvements. Short and long-term recommendations were developed to address the problem locations. The short-term recommendations include improvements that potentially could be implemented relatively quickly, and in fact several have been implemented already. The long-term recommendations include improvements that would require additional study, coordination, public notification and/or additional funding resources. The study was completed in April 2009.

US 13/40 Photos


US 13/DuPont Highway Pedestrian Safety Study

The Delaware Department of Transportation, in conjunction with our partners at the Office of Highway Safety and Delaware State Police established the pedestrian/bicycle safety working group in February 2013 due to the number of pedestrian and bicycle related fatalities and incapacitating injury crashes in 2012. The purpose of the working group was to develop ideas and methods for improving pedestrian and bicycle safety through engineering, education and enforcement related activities. As part of the engineering effort, crash data research was conducted by DelDOT's Traffic Section which identified principal arterial roadways in New Castle County, such as US 13/DuPont Highway, to have an unusually high concentration of pedestrian crashes.

The US 13/DuPont Highway Pedestrian Safety Study was a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to evaluate existing pedestrian accommodations during typical weekday and weekend conditions on US 13/DuPont Highway from SR 273 to Market St/Walnut St split in New Castle County. An in-depth investigation was conducted to identify problem locations and develop short-term, mid-term, and long-term recommendations for improvements. Generally, mid-term and long-term recommendations require design efforts and additional coordination between multiple stakeholders. Therefore, these improvements have been prioritized based on a review of pedestrian crash history, pedestrian frequency, and transit ridership to prioritize resources. Short-term improvements have not been prioritized, as it is assumed these can be accomplished relatively quickly through other projects (e.g. pave & rehab) or through relatively low impact/low cost projects. The study was completed in August 2015.


SR 2 Kirkwood Highway Pedestrian Safety Study

The Delaware Department of Transportation, in conjunction with our partners at the Office of Highway Safety and Delaware State Police established the pedestrian/bicycle safety working group in February 2013 due to the number of pedestrian and bicycle related fatalities and incapacitating injury crashes in 2012. The purpose of the working group was to develop ideas and methods for improving pedestrian and bicycle safety through engineering, education and enforcement related activities. As part of the engineering effort, crash data research was conducted by DelDOT's Traffic Section which identified principal arterial roadways in New Castle County, such as SR 2/Kirkwood Highway, to have an unusually high concentration of pedestrian crashes.

The SR 2 Kirkwood Highway Pedestrian Safety Study was a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to evaluate existing pedestrian accommodations during typical weekday and weekend conditions on SR 2/Kirkwood Highway from St. James Church Road/Griffin Drive to SR 141. An in-depth investigation was conducted to identify problem locations and develop short-term, mid-term, and long-term recommendations for improvements. Generally, mid-term and long-term recommendations require design efforts and additional coordination between multiple stakeholders. Therefore, these improvements have been prioritized based on a review of pedestrian crash history, pedestrian frequency, and transit ridership to prioritize resources. Short-term improvements have not been prioritized, as it is assumed these can be accomplished relatively quickly through other projects (e.g. pave & rehab) or through relatively low impact/low cost projects. The study was completed in January 2015. SR 2 Improvement Matrix – Status Report

SR 2/Kirkwood Highway Photos


SR 273 Pedestrian Safety Study

During 2006, the State of Delaware experienced an unusually high number of pedestrian fatalities. Research conducted by DelDOT's Division of Planning identified several corridors within New Castle County with unusually high concentrations of pedestrian crashes including US 13, US 40, and SR 273.

The SR 273 Pedestrian and Bicycle Road Safety Audit was a collaborative, multi-disciplinary effort to evaluate existing pedestrian accommodations during typical weekday and weekend conditions on SR 273 from US 13 to the City of Newark. An in-depth investigation was conducted to identify problem locations and develop short and long term recommendations for improvements. Short-term projects are those that can be implemented in 0-2 years through other projects (e.g. pave & rehab) or through relatively low impact/low cost projects. Several improvements have been implemented already. Long-term projects are those that require additional engineering, environmental analysis, coordination, public review, and establishment of funding sources. The final report is expected to be complete by Spring 2011.

SR 273 Photos


SR 72 at Farm Lane - HAWK Signal

A Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon, or HAWK (High Intensity Activated Cross Walk) signal is a traffic control device intended to warn and control traffic at pedestrian crossing locations. This traffic control device is different from a traditional traffic signal. The HAWK consists of a Red-Yellow-Red signal indication for motorists. The signal remains dark until a pedestrian activates the system by pressing a button. First, a FLASHING YELLOW light warns motorists that a pedestrian is present. The signal then changes to SOLID YELLOW, alerting drivers to prepare to stop. The signal then turns SOLID RED and provides a "WALK" symbol to the pedestrian. The signal then begins ALTERNATING FLASHING RED and the pedestrian is shown a flashing "DON'T WALK" with a countdown timer. Drivers are allowed to proceed during the flashing red after coming to a full stop and making sure there is no danger to pedestrians.

HAWK Signal Photos


Other Pedestrian Safety Projects

US 202 (Concord Pike) - Naamans Road to Rocky Run Parkway, Pedestrian Access Route Improvements

SR 48 (Lancaster Avenue) from West Court Drive to North DuPont Road
NOTE: These improvements are currently in design and construction of these improvements is expected to occur in FY 2019



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